High-Strength Low-Alloy(HSLA) Steels

High-Strength Low-Alloy(HSLA) Steels

 or microalloyed steels, are designed to provide better mechanical properties and/or greater resistance to atmospheric corrosion than conventional carbon steels. They are not considered to be alloy steels in the normal sense because they are designed to meet specific mechanical properties rather than a chemical composition (HSLA steels have yield strengths greater than 275 MPa, or 40 ksi). The chemical composition of a specific HSLA steel may vary for different product thicknesses to meet mechanical property requirements.

The HSLA steels in sheet or plate form have low carbon content (0.05 to −0.25% C) in order to produce adequate formability and weldability, and they have manganese content up to 2.0%. Small quantities of chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, nitrogen, vanadium, niobium, titanium, and zirconium are used in various combinations.
Applications of HSLA steels include oil and gas pipelines, heavy-duty highway and off-road vehicles, construction and farm machinery,  industrial equipment, storage tanks, mine and railroad cars, barges  and dredges, snowmobiles, lawn mowers, and passenger car components. Bridges, offshore structures, power transmission  towers, light poles, and building beams and panels are additional uses of these steels.
The choice of a specific high-strength steel depends on a number of application requirements including thickness reduction, corrosion resistance, formability, and weldability. For many applications, the most important factor in the steel selection process is the favorable strength-to-weight